Gardening #3 (why it can be ‘green’, sometimes)

In my previous post I pointed out that gardening is not necessarily a ‘green’ activity. It can be just as much a shopping opportunity as anything else, it can leave a wider footprint than you might expect.

A quick digression

For example, in my own efforts with the TSRB (tiny snail-ridden backyard), I’ve got to the point where I feel like I could just about imagine taking on an allotment (especially if I shared it). There are plenty of very local allotments – but with gigantic waiting lists. There are also plenty of immediately available allotments – but on the other side of the city. That makes a big difference: I could take on an allotment next season but it would have to be on an easy bus or cycle route and I’d need a regular, firm, block of time which would have to be reserved purely for work on it – no nipping out in the odd spare hour when I fancy it, no copping out when I don’t fancy it.

At this point all normal, right-thinking people will say “well silly you, just get a car, like everyone else! If it hurts your self-respect so much to buy one, then use a car club”. After all, my few years of driving, back in the last century, occurred because I was playing a lot of gigs, so I have in the past owned a car in order to facilitate engagement with a serious and noble activity and surely growing food is just as serious as music? Ah but the difference is that this time you are suggesting that in order to increase my personal sustainability in one area I should reduce it in another.

A not uncommon dilemma, btw. I’ve talked about another example in one of my interminable posts about flying (especially this one, from about halfway down and footnote 4).

(a digression from the digression

Not everyone even recognizes that extra car use reduces overall sustainability or is problematic. I once heard Lynn Sloman, author of car sick, make the comment that their car use is almost invisible to many greenies – almost as if it doesn’t count because it is the noble steed from which they conduct their activism (that last bit was not Lynn’s way of putting it btw). I was rather surprised to hear this, but this was probably because I didn’t know many enviros personally at that point. I’ve been watching carefully since, and you know, I think she’s right. Outside the specialised world of sustainable transport campaigners, it often doesn’t seem to register as a problem – well of course you need a car to facilitate your engagement with nature. Or rather, you need a car because you are special and ethical. But I’m not special and ethical so I’m not going to start driving in order to access an allotment and so, no, I probably won’t be getting one (well, ok, there are a few other reasons as well, but I am starting to wish I had a bit more garden to muck around with, and this is a real discussion I’m having with myself).

End of digressions!

Don’t give ”gardening”, without qualification, a free pass. But obviously, low-cost, thoughtful gardening is indeed a pretty “eco” thing to do and I’m glad that I’ve finally got to grips with it, even in a small way, even as a mere “garden-themed science project”. Here’s why I consider it worthwhile.

Any practical skill is worth having, for purely functional reasons.

You never know when it might come in handy. Self-sufficiency is completely out of the question, however you define it. It won’t save you money, at least not to begin with, and probably not much even once established. But … can I be entirely sure that the current situation, where there is food of any kind, at any season, from anywhere in the world, easily obtainable and affordable, will continue throughout the rest of my lifetime? This situation might well continue – I’m certainly not expecting the sky to fall in tomorrow, or next year, or ever, because that’s a silly image anyway. But I do think that the argument that we (and “we” means the whole world, with us anglophones in the lead) are well embarked on a gradual downward slide is not a foolish one and could well be, broadly, true . That discussion will eventually be the topic of a whole post to itself.

Any practical skill is worth having, for purely psychological reasons.

It makes you feel good to be able to do things. Real things – involving your body and mind (gardening involves not just digging, clipping and lugging but also considerable amounts of planning, deduction, and imagination), and, to get completely pompous about it, we are the kind of creature that needs to use both. This connects with the previous point. Sure, maybe there never will be any sort of food crisis in my lifetime or beyond, but knowing that if there were to be, I’m set to be a teeny part of the answer is a good feeling. If one feels helpless, then one is helpless.

Any practical skill is worth having, for purely social reasons.

You have something else to talk about. You have surplus to give people, which creates goodwill, and maybe they give you some of their surplus too, but it feels like more than mere exchange. Though it wasn’t quite how Ivan Illich meant the phrase, gardening is a tool for conviviality.

Those all sound pretty ‘green’ to me.

And then of course, there is what you actually learn from the attempt to grow edible stuff. Next time.

Oh all right, if you insist

Yeah, ok, my election prediction. Which is:

Record low turnout.

(With possible exception of Bristol West, where I live, which might just possibly do a Brighton Pavilion and elect a Green).

Because we’re all fed up.

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Update: 9:00 am Thursday

Well it seems my prediction could well be wrong.

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Update: a few days later

ok, never accept a political prediction from me. Maybe I just need more practice.